Musings of an “Old Man”

re-posted with permission, and written by Ken Galama

I keep thinking about a DSLR.

I keep getting confused with all the different sensors and pixels.

I miss the days before digital cameras.

Back then the debate that raged was about which medium format camera was best. (yes it was square and no it wasn’t Bronica)

When it came to 35mm it was Canon or Nikon (sorry Pentax and Minolta). There really was no significant difference. You either liked the feel of one or the other and that was it.

Film was the real variable to understand. It was organic, with its moods. It demanded to be treated like the proverbial Goldie Locks. Not too hot, not too cold.

The lab that processed the colour film was like a maternity ward with anxious photographers waiting the delivery of their precious images. Ripping open packages, flipping through prints, negatives being examined. Each image scrutinized, some cherished others aborted.

But every photographer had religion when it came to black and white. I never met a photographer that didn’t process and print their own black and white film.

Ansel Adams was the founder of that religion yet every photographer had their own private ceremony.

After the film was dry and an image chosen for printing the photographer conjured his image from a beam of light. Dodging and burning creating a unique hand made image.

That final print was a direct link to the photons that bounced of the subject. A continuum that was created by the photographer, frozen in time.

I’ve turned into the old man that sits on his porch reminiscing about those days back then, when film was a thing that mattered.

 

(Ken was classmate of Colleen’s from her Algonquin College Photography days, you can follow him – or his dog Buddy on Twitter @Chelsea_Buddy)

Hartblei – Larger Than Life

Medium Format Quality – View Camera Movement

By Cedric Swaneck – Freelance Photographer/POCP Assistant

A couple of months ago, I was at B3k Digital chatting with Colleen and local photographer Christopher Gentile about the merits of tilt/shift lenses. Right on queue Colleen presented us with the Hartblei trio of tilt/shift SuperRotator lenses. They offer the 40mm f/4, 80mm f/2.8 and 120mm f/4 lenses. The build quality of these lenses is impressive to say the least.

Equipped with cutting edge Carl Zeiss optics, the Hartblei line of lenses offers DSLR professionals true medium format quality glass. Not only is the quality of glass incredible, but the versatility and flexibility of the SuperRotator tilt/shift design offers the photographer more creative and technical options than ever. You have 360 degrees of rotation and independent control of the tilt and shift movements. The movement of these lenses is almost like that of a view camera. The barrel build quality is amazing. All of the elements flow smoothly and lock with military precision. It’s like having a high tech tank in your hands.

The 40mm f/4 lens comes equipped with a built-in tripod mount, which you will definitely need. The Hartblei 40 is a real big boy weighing in at 1,490 grams (1.49 kg/3.28 lbs)! I would definitely recommended using the Arca Swiss P0 tripod head with this lens. A great standard lens and a great workout.

The 80mm f/2.8 was the easiest of the three lenses to maneuver. Like the rest of the lineup, this lens was tack sharp and the image quality was excellent. The dimensionality of these tilt shifts can really make your subject really pop while creating a silky smooth bokeh.

I would have liked some more time with the 120mm f/4 lens to play with it’s macro capabilities. Maybe even try it out with an extension tube. The sample image below was taken straight on without tilt or shift. Super sharp and fairly easy to control lens. This lens is equipped with dual focus rings helping you get closer to your subject.

Sample Images

 

(Canon 5D Mk II - Hartblei 40mm f/11 2 sec. full shift and tilt)

(Canon 5D Mk II - Hartblei 40mm f/11 1/2 sec. full shift)

(Canon 5D Mk II - Hartblei 40mm f/11 2 sec. full shift)

(Canon 5D Mk II - Hartblei 80mm f/11 1/2 sec. full shift)

(Canon 5D Mk II - Hartblei 120mm f/11 1/2 sec.)

For an in-depth review and more sample images visit Lloyd Chambers’ blog.

http://diglloyd.com/articles/Hartblei-pub/Main.html

For more info on Hartblei and technical specs visit the Hartblei website.

http://www.hartblei.de/en/sr40if.htm

All images are copyright Cedric Swaneck. Special thanks to Eleni at Dwell Gym.

 

Cedric the Photographer at Doors Open Toronto

You may have seen him in our store chatting with Jim, drinking coffee in the kitchen with Colleen, or with his laptop open and sitting with Walter. He pops in here frequently – introducing Cedric the Photographer, a freelance photographer and POCP certified assistant based in Toronto.

He began on his path into photography when he quit his job, bought a digital camera and plane ticket to Chile (when 3.3 megapixels cost $1000). He started with landscape photography because, as he likes to say, “landscapes don’t talk back.” His next big step into the world photography was when he accepted a job as a portrait photographer with Heirloom Portraits. Traveling throughout Canada’s remote northern communities taking school photos and family portraits was his day job for months on end. This interesting job also provided him with many opportunities over the years to continue with his landscape work. He has since worked in a wide range of photographic areas, with his focus on studio portraiture. Visit www.cedricswaneck.com for more information.

We set Cedric up with a Cambo Wide RS camera, a Shcneider Apo-Digital 47mm f/5.6 copal 0, and the Phase One IQ160 digital back for the Doors Open Toronto weekend.

(all images are copyright Cedric Swaneck)

Please visit Cedric’s blog where he outlines his recent experience with this technical equipment supplied by B3K Digital and to see more of his photographs from Doors Open Toronto.